Native American resources

We’ve focused a lot during this countdown on Native American issues, but of course we’ve only scratched the surface of what’s interesting and meaningful.  If you want to look further into some of these questions, or anything else relevant to Native peoples, here are some useful resources.

An exhaustive Native American resource page.

Wikipedia’s Indigenous Peoples of North American portal.

Indian Country Today Media Network.

The text of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

And because I can’t resist, here’s a link to an article on Rez Ball.

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It’s One Day until SKIN OF THE WOLF…

 

Mask, Possibly of Usofuki, Character in Kyogen Plays, 18th-19th century
Mask, Possibly of Usofuki, Character in Kyogen Plays, 18th-19th century

 

A Native American ceremonial mask up for auction at Sotheby’s lies at the heart of Skin of the Wolf. We are celebrating the use of masks throughout the world and across time by featuring a new mask daily as we count down to publication day on July 31, 2014. To pre-order and for more information please use the links on your left.

 

The original source for today’s mask can be found here.

Werewolf Books

Although SKIN OF THE WOLF isn’t exactly a “werewolf book,” it should appeal to anyone interested in shapeshifting or people who have the ability to turn into wolves (and other animals).  Adam Lipkin wrote a very nice consideration of the best werewolf books, both fiction and nonfiction, for the Bookslut blog.  You can read it here.

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It’s 2 Days until SKIN OF THE WOLF…

 

Quileute Wolf Mask, Washington, USA, 1880-1910
Quileute Wolf Mask, Washington, USA, 1880-1910

 

 

A Native American ceremonial mask up for auction at Sotheby’s lies at the heart of Skin of the Wolf. We are celebrating the use of masks throughout the world and across time by featuring a new mask daily as we count down to publication day on July 31, 2014. To pre-order and for more information please use the links on your left.

 

The original source for today’s mask can be found here.

John and Sebastian Cabot: Father and Son Explorers

The Catholic Encyclopedia entry for the father and son explorers, John and Sebastian Cabot, can be found here.  Note the striking family resemblance between father and son, even in beard grooming, hat, and coat preferences.  One of the characters in Sam Cabot’s SKIN OF THE WOLF hitched a ride to Newfoundland with John Cabot in 1498.

John Cabot (Giovanni Caboto)
John Cabot (Giovanni Caboto)
Sebastian Cabot
Sebastian Cabot

National Museum of the American Indian, redux

This is a video from the NMAI about a sculptural work entitled “Always Becoming.”  This is what the NMAI has to say about it.  Thought you’d like to see it.

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These clay sculptures, titled “Always Becoming”, range in height from seven and a half to sixteen feet tall. The clay — malleable and forgiving — is built around natural materials to represent origin, family, and belonging in Native cultures. A walk through the sculptures exudes a quiet, peaceful sensation of entering a place rooted in the past, but always looking towards the future.

The pieces, painstakingly crafted by Santa Clara Pueblo artist Nora Naranjo-Morse, are designed to melt back into the earth over time.  But, why?

The inspiration for the figures is drawn from Santa Clara Pueblo oral tradition, and they are named Father, Mother, Little One, Moon Woman, and Mountain Bird. They are crafted from naturally changing and evolving elements of the earth such as dirt, sand, straw, clay, stone, black locust wood, bamboo, grass, and yam vines. The past shaped the sculptures, but they will change and evolve, much like the Native people whose heritage they represent.

Naranjo-Morse drew inspiration from the unique relationship that Native peoples have to the environment, and the Museum’s commitment to educating visitors about this bond. She used the same mud mixture used to build homes and structures in the Southwest to finish the sculptures, emphasizing the idea of the museum and its grounds as a home for Native people and their vibrant cultures. She also used personal touches on the sculptures – the Father sculpture is centered by a viga, or wood pole, from her home. Hand cut by her parents in the 1950s, it represents the ideas of ancestors and family.

As the sculptures transition and become part of the earth, artists, including Naranjo-Morse’s daughter, will return each year to add new elements. An evolving community of artists will conserve the sculptures, bringing their own experiences and stories to life with clay.

It’s 3 Days until SKIN OF THE WOLF…

 

Mexico, Guerrero, Mezcala, 500 B.C. - A.D. 100
Mexico, Guerrero, Mezcala, 500 B.C. – A.D. 100

 

 

A Native American ceremonial mask up for auction at Sotheby’s lies at the heart of Skin of the Wolf. We are celebrating the use of masks throughout the world and across time by featuring a new mask daily as we count down to publication day on July 31, 2014. To pre-order and for more information please use the links on your left.

 

The original source for today’s mask can be found here.

Artifacts at auction

If you’re wondering why Native Americans seem so sensitive to their art and artifacts being sold at auction, consider this.  And consider the icy blood of someone who’d even consider purchasing it.  And the total tone-deafness of the auction house that accepted it in the first place, before bad publicity made them pull it.

 

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